PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
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TOPIC: But not kissed your keeper's daughter?

But not kissed your keeper's daughter? 4 years 4 months ago #4975

What does this mean????

who is the keeper

and why does he say this to Shallow?

I am assuming it is a taunt but not sure why it strikes close to home with Shallow

Help??
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But not kissed your keeper's daughter? 4 years 4 months ago #4976

The keeper is the man who takes care of Shallow's lodge. Falstaff knows he's done what Shallow is accusing him of and is antagonizing him. Poaching is a very serious crime and Shallow is livid—even more so when Falstaff doesn't take his accusation seriously. In fact, he's implying yet another crime was committed in the act.
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But not kissed your keeper's daughter? 4 years 4 months ago #4977

Thank You!
Can you recommend a good resource that I could use to find out what additional lines in the play mean? Saying like "Tut, a pin" have me at a loss
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But not kissed your keeper's daughter? 4 years 4 months ago #4978

I highly recommend Shakespeare's Words...

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0140291172?ta ... espeare-20

A "pin" is a "trifle".
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But not kissed your keeper's daughter? 4 years 4 months ago #4979

Another very useful tip! Thanks again

I am playing Falstaff in an upcoming production of Merry Wives in August.

I would love to review any character analysis etc. that might be helpful.

I want to fully develop the character and hopefully do the role justice

Tips & Suggestions appreciated

thanks

J
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Re: But not kissed your keeper's daughter? 4 years 4 months ago #4998

Critics tend to denigrate the Falstaff of MERRY WIVES, regarding him as a greatly diminished figure in comparison with the classic Falstaff of the Henries. My personal opinion has always been a little different, though my affection for the MW Falstaff may be due in large part to my having done a fine production of the play as a young actor of 19, when my career was just starting out. What some commentators regard as slapdash characterization certainly may have to do with haste in the composition, if there's any truth to the tradition that the play was composed ad hoc, in a short period, in response to the Queen's expressed desire to see "Falstaff in love." Shakespeare must have realized that it was impossible to impose a true romantic sensibility on the majestic character he'd created-- being in love implies a vulnerability and a degree of selflessness which is fundamentally at odds with the Falstaffian characteristics of appetite and manipulativeness-- so he settled more for a "Falstaff in lust" strategy, seeing comic potential in the monstrous inappropriateness of an elderly fat man fancying himself as a "young gallant." The different demands of a farce plot require that this Falstaff be more of an ensemble performer, less a dominant figure in the plot; but much of his mastery of language still remains, and it's important that the actor honor that uniqueness of expression, in all its tawdry glory. Always in Shakespeare, language is action, and in Falstaff most of all. Find the vitality and color in that remarkable prose, and you'll be more than halfway there.

Julian
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