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TOPIC: Edward De Vere - The Real Author

Edward De Vere - The Real Author 2 years 9 months ago #5631

Since the 18th century, there has been a lingering question as to whether William Shakespeare actually wrote the works attributed to him. The top contenders for the authorship question are Edward De Vere and Christopher Marlowe, but most of the evidence found while researching the debate proves that De Vere wrote the pieces credited to Shakespeare. De Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford, has notable similarities to Shakespeare’s works. There were many parallels found between Polonius of Hamlet and De Vere’s guardian, William Cecil. There were also coincidences between De Vere’s own life and Hamlet, including a string of passages from a family Bible. One could say that Hamlet was an autobiography of De Vere’s life because of his tennis quarrel with Sydney and the fact that they both killed a man. De Vere’s life was similar to Romeo and Juliet as well – both had a battle between two families followed by a death on each side. Another peculiar finding worth noting is the lion “shaking a spear” on Oxford’s coat of arms. That appears to be a little too coincidental. These evident parallels between the Earl’s life and Shakespeare’s works certainly cannot be overlooked.
Although Edward De Vere has a great deal of evidence pointing in his favor, many scholars still believe that William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon was the true author of the Shakespeare works. Members of the Stratford camp believe the actor of Stratford-upon-Avon was the true author mainly because it is the most plausible option. Stratfordians cite historical documents of the time period to support their claim of Shakespeare as the true author. One of the most obvious pieces of evidence in Shakespeare’s favor is the fact that all the plays and poems bear the name “William Shakespeare”. Yet, this fact can be easily explained by the presence of a pseudonym used by Edward De Vere to conceal his identity. Another piece of evidence used by the Stratford camp is the fact that William Shakespeare was an actor in the company which performed the plays accredited to him. Anti-Stratfordians cannot argue this fact, but they are able to state that just because he was an actor in the company does not make him the author of the works that were performed. One more piece of evidence supporting the Stratford camp is that Shakespeare’s funerary monument in Stratford bears an engraving that identifies him as a writer. Yet in favor of the Oxfordians, it is reasonable to speculate that the monument had been altered from its original form in order to protect the true identity of the writer. The members of the Stratford camp may present solid evidence on the surface, but if a person looks past the obvious he is able to see the logic of Edward De Vere as the author of the Shakespearean works.
Playing a large role in proving authorship, Edward De Vere’s high-quality education leads many to believe he is in fact the author of the Shakespearian works. Oxfordians and Stratfordians recognize that, in order to write about royal courts, Italian law required a certain prerequisite level of education. The fact that De Vere graduated at age 14 from Cambridge University is very widely accepted. He then became Master of Arts at only 16 years old. With this kind of reputation, he is identified as meeting the qualifications necessary to generate Shakespeare’s productions. For example, the play The Merchant of Venice discussed law, and De Vere studied law, which suggests that he had the knowledge to write this particular play. Edward De Vere is also known to have traveled to Italy in the 1570s, putting him in an ideal position to write knowledgeably about the Venice. Similarities also exist between De Vere and the character Hamlet. In 1572, it is said that Edward De Vere and others routinely played practical jokes on ill-fated travelers on the same stretch of road as Prince Hal does in the play. The most convincing piece of evidence is the fact that Venus and Adonis, derived from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, could only have been possible with Arthur Golding’s translation of this work. Arthur Golding was De Vere’s uncle and his translation was said to be dedicated to De Vere.
It is rumored that Christopher Marlowe was the true writer of Shakespeare. Although some strongly believe that is true, this cannot possibly be accurate because of his death in 1593. The dates of Shakespeare’s works range from the early 1590s until 1611. Previous to Marlowe’s death, he was put in jail for unknown reasons. During the time of the publishing, Marlowe was said to be in jail, making it impossible for him to have written it. It is also rumored that Marlowe faked his death to escape his conviction, however, there is no hard evidence confirming that this was in fact true. Marlowe may have used some of the similar writing styles as Shakespeare, but De Vere had many more similarities such as Shakespeare and De Vere both having strong connections to Elizabeth, and many similarities between De Vere’s writings and Hamlet. Marlowe could not possibly be the writer of Shakespeare because of his death and his unexplainable jail time.
Many believe that the true author of Shakespeare’s plays was an aristocrat named Edward De Vere. It can be argued that Shakespeare and De Vere had very similar writing styles, each having consistent flow and comparable theatric style. Specifically, Shakespeare’s six-line pentameter stanza style can be seen in several literary works of Edward De Vere, such as Echo Verses and What Cunning Can I Express. De Vere’s work used a metrical pattern consisting of lines of unrhymed “blank verse.” This was extremely similar to Shakespeare’s later work in which used the same blank verse and poetic pattern. Although common in the 16th century writing, De Vere used a genre of poetry called Lyric Poetry, which expressed personal and emotional feelings. This Lyrical style emulates what Shakespeare would have done in his poems. Another way that De Vere emulated Shakespeare’s writing style was through the use of sonnets. These sonnets are consistent in both of the writers work, and show almost identical structure. Shakespeare’s poetry may have been some of the most influential pieces of literature in today’s society, but his style of writing is closely rivaled by those of Edward De Vere.
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Re: Edward De Vere - The Real Author 2 years 9 months ago #5654

The Oxford Case. Now a film ... Disputed dates ... was The Tempest about a shipwreck that happened in 1610, was macBeth inspired by the Gunpowder plot of 1605 etc. etc. The Oxfordians will always say "no" of course (well they have to, their man died in 1604).

So much more important than all this citing of dates, parallels between Oxford's life and Hamlet, quotes from sonnets about "my name being hidden" is the theatricality of the plays and the creation of the characters. These plays could only be wrought by someone who LIVED the theatre, who was a player and knew how to "speak the speech"

Look at the "Oh what a rogue and peasant slave am I" speech. The misuse of the iambic pentameter, short lines, midline endings, replacement of iambs for trochees, lines with more than 10 beats etc etc are all gifts for the actor. Only a player could write like that. Anybody who had received a classical education would never make those "mistakes"

Playhouse practice. The plays belonged to the companies, not to the authors. Shakespeare was the only playwright out of the 22 or so professional playwights of the time who was a playing member of a company. The players controlled what plays to perform and how the plays were written. And the plays had to reflect the members of the company (or hired men and boy apprentices) available. A Midsummer Night's Dream, for example, could only be played if the company had 2 good boy actors, one tall, one short. The players would decide which plays to present in what we would now call committee. It is unimaginable that William Shakespeare, as a playing member of the company, managed to hide for over 15 years the fact that he was not the author of the plays under consideration. And equally unimaginable that the entire company knew and yet nobody ever let slip the slightest indication.

John Heminges knew Shakespeare for over 30 years. They met in probably 1587 and Heminges was a beneficiary in Shakespeare's will. As was Burbage. They were all liars? Why?

The Oxford argument often turns around his relationship with Queen Elizabeth and the necessity to hide his identity for these plays. Firstly, there are a number of contemporary references to plays penned by Oxford, none of which has survived (one has to question why) and secondly, Elizabeth died before Oxford, so why not "come clean" after her death? In 1623 when the First Folio was printed, Elizabeth had been dead for 20 years and Oxford for 19. What possible motivation could there be for continuing the pretence?

All the arguments for Oxford are "coincidental". (a lion shaking a spear on a coat of arms ... ???) The documentation for the Stratford man is extant. Francis Meres mentions BOTH Oxford and Shakespeare as playwrights of the time. And there are numerous other references to Shkespeare Poet and Playwright in contemporary documents. Some people have cited Oxford's poetry as "similar in style" Well indeed ... they both used a metric rhyming form / discipline that was popular at the time. It's a bit like saying that John Lee Hooker and B.B. King use a similar style. The discipline of 12 bar blues is common to both but any comparison ends there.

The debate will continue, of that there is no doubt. As an actor and director I cannot help the feeling that the Oxfordians are like Tybalt ... "deaf to reason"
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Re: Edward De Vere - The Real Author 2 years 5 months ago #6476

  • tom Baker
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For me the question of authorship is settled by the with the publication of the first folio. Was it Shakespeare's family or his estate that paid the 1000 pound cost for publication. No it is paid for by Susan De Vere's husband and brother.
Susan De Vere is the daughter of Edward DeVere.
My logical question is this. Why was Susan DeVere involved in the publication of the works of Shakespeare when her own father is listed in the early 1600's as a great Elizabethan poet. Why did she not publish his works. The first folio was for a run of 500 copies sold at one pound each. It was therefore a labour of love. Ben Jonson who did not write a poem at Shakespeare's death writes the introductory poem in the first folio. Does this say more about Ben's close relationship with Susan De Vere than to the man from Stratford
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Re: Edward De Vere - The Real Author 2 years 4 months ago #6488

I'm not a scholar of this debate, but in my opinion James Shapiro argued convincingly against the Oxford theory in his "Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?" (Simon and Schuster, 2010).
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Re: Edward De Vere - The Real Author 1 year 2 months ago #6776

You are basing your opinion on someone who admittedly knows little about the 17th Earl of Oxford. He does, however, have the gall to speculate on the mental condition of Sigmund Freud, who was a confirmed Oxfordian after reading the 1920 book, "Shakespeare Identified". I'm in the creative arts, and I know how the process works. Shapiro is not, and does not. No offense to him, I accept him as a Professor of English Literature. I have zero respect for his attitude, and haughty admission that he knows next to nothing about Edward de Vere. I suggest you read about de Vere, either by buying or borrowing a copy of "Shakespeare by Another Name" by Mark Anderson, or some of the biographical content found online on the Oxfordian websites. I did notice that Shapiro did not mention that Walt Whitman was a devout Anti-Stratfordian. Had he lived to 1920, I have no doubt he would have been an Oxfordian, as he had a premonition that the true author of the history plays was "one of the wolfish Earls" so close to the Queen herself. If you think about it, it is absurd to imagine a commoner telling the 3rd Earl of Southampton he should get married.(to one of Oxford's daughters, "by chance") Shaksper would have been executed or had a hand removed for such an act of hubris. Kindly note that the First Folio was dedicated to De Vere's in-laws. Shapiro did not feel the need to tell you that. Kindly note that the printer dedicated an earlier book, a major project, to Susan de Vere. I think it was dedicated to her as enticement to receive permission to work on the First Folio. There's no link between de Vere's family and the man from Stratford. Why would Oxford's family have an interest in a Stratford money lender and part time actor's work? In short, you need to read up on Edward de Vere, so you can make an informed opinion. Mr. Shapiro simply suffers from cognitive dissonance. Sorry we've killed Santa Claus. It's a fascinating mystery, and worth your time to read up on the 17th Earl of Oxford. Happy reading~~~~
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Re: Edward De Vere - The Real Author 1 year 2 months ago #6779

The "Oxford case" has not been made into a film. The film "Anonymous" is fiction, and has an agenda to drive a particular story which is for entertainment. It is rife with historical inaccuracies, as many of Shakespeare's history plays did, when it suited the plot and storyline.
The film was directed by someone who speaks English as a second language. It shows. It's a flawed film with some good visuals. It was not made to prove the Oxfordian case.
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Re: Edward De Vere - The Real Author 1 year 2 months ago #6780

The "Oxford case" has not been made into a film. The film "Anonymous" is fiction, and has an agenda to drive a particular story which is for entertainment. It is rife with historical inaccuracies, as many of Shakespeare's history plays did, when it suited the plot and storyline.
The film was directed by someone who speaks English as a second language. It shows. It's a flawed film with some good visuals. It was not made to prove the Oxfordian case.
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