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TOPIC: MY EXPERIENCE OF ACTING IN SHAKESPEAREAN PLAYS

MY EXPERIENCE OF ACTING IN SHAKESPEAREAN PLAYS 3 months 2 weeks ago #6964

  • Gautam
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The song is sung (and in most productions it actually is sung, though the music
used in Shakespeare's time has been lost) . ... Fear no more the heat o' th' sun Nor the furious winter’s rages;
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta’en thy wages:
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney-sweepers, come to dust......

The lines from Cymbeline connect to the strong use of nature imagery that appears throughout the novel. The characters who are most connected to nature, such as Clarissa and Septimus, are also the most responsive to poetry and reflect about death and their place in the world most frequently. Both Clarissa and Septimus feel the importance of fire. The “heat o’ the sun” can appear as something wonderful, like passion. Clarissa describes romantic love as “a match burning in a crocus.” The heat can also consume, however, and Septimus, mentally wounded by the horrors of war, feels that the world will erupt in flames, in a fire that can no longer be contained. Whether wonderful or deadly, the heat of the sun is constant, and something everyone must endure. The quote suggests that death be embraced as a release from the burden of endurance


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Last Edit: 3 months 2 weeks ago by Gautam. Reason: THE MEANING AND SYNOPSIS
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