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TOPIC: Figurative language in Henry V

Figurative language in Henry V 6 years 9 months ago #1532

  • kelcb22
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I was assigned these through study passages from Henry V :
Act 1 scene 1 lines 24-66 (1.1:24-66)
Canterbury/ Ely
"The courses of his youth...."
Are these 2 gentlemen seriously examining the King's issues with France or are they looking rather intently at their own interests? What are they really saying about the King's questionable behavior as a prince? What is meant by the image: "Strawberry... underneath the nettle"?

1.2:237-297 Ambassadors/ King Henry/ Exeter
"May it please your majesty..."
What bold statement is the Dauphin of France registering here through his ambassadors? How effectively are the terms of tennis sustained throughout this passage? How do you judge the king's response? Concerned and embarrassed or does he demonstrate the regal poise expetced of a model monarch?

4.1:87-301
Bates/ court/ williams/ King Henry
"Brother John Bates...."
These lines may be the key to unlock both Henry IV part I and Henry V. Why does king go disguised among the common soldiers during darkest hour of the night? Is it to comfort the troops and genuinely learn their will or is this a troubled mind looking for support and not finding it? What do you make of the logic used by Williams? What's the conclusion you draw from all of this?
5.2: 136-291
King Henry/ Katherine
"Marry, if you would......"
is this a touching love scene that impressivlely culminates a powerful play or is it a facade that plays with the French language, convincing us that she cares not at all for him and that he has minimal interest in her? what key words and phrass persuaded you?

I am an independent study student and I am trying to get the discussion aspect that I miss without beining in a classroom. Any ideas or suggestions help more than you know and are greatly appreciated.

The italicized words are to help you find the passages since not all books are numbered the same.
My assignment is to write at least 2 paragraphs for each of the above passages one in which I identify literarcy techniques employed and another in which i discuss how these techniques effectively emphasize the important issues presented by Shakespeare. Also comment on his success in using sound patterns to give these ideas artistic emphasis. Thanks
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Figurative language in Henry V 6 years 9 months ago #1534

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Act I scene i
Are these 2 gentlemen seriously examining the King's issues with France or are they looking rather intently at their own interests?

Answer: yes.

What are they really saying about the King's questionable behavior as a prince?
Ans.- Somewhat deplorable, wouldn't you say? That even bleeds through rather accurate, yet sycophantic descriptions of both his behavior before and after his, according to Cant., "miraculous" yet not so miraculous transformation--since "...Miracles are ceast:"

What is meant by the image: "Strawberry... underneath the nettle"?

Ans.-- the wild strawberry is a tasty and desirable fruit, but thorny in the seeking-- other references come to mind re: HV's character--Out of a lump of coal--rough-handled enough--may come a diamond. There's also a little touch of "If the experience doesn't destroy us,it makes us stronger" etc. ...
[And]Ely: "We are blessed in the Change."

Most of the questions about the material are "either/or" queries, and the answers to all of them are either/or as well. Shakespeare's philosophical brilliance inherent throughout all of his work is in the asking of the question, providing more than one "true" answer, and offering argument for both the proponent and the opposition through not only the images and metaphor, but also within the very makeup of the characters themselves-they who spout this beautiful paradox of visions and allusion. The "answers" lie in finding how Shakespeare did this--and thus, whoever made up the questions you must answer, was highly influenced in the making of them, simply by looking a little at how many "answers" there were--although NONE can claim authority over the others. This is The Question-ing process, part and parcel, of the open minded, "studied" philosopher.
So your quest lies not in finding THE "correct" answer--but in finding how many different ways you can find to support ALL of the answers. To do that, you have to be willing to support both sides of an issue with equal fervor--as did Shakespeare--The Philosopher Human in Us All.

Hint: It's all written there for you in the questions--they couldn't help handing out some answers while asking for some.

More later...
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Figurative language in Henry V 6 years 9 months ago #1538

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Thanks so much a lot of the things you said i had thought of and in posting this topic i am hoping to find a place to discuss such issues in Shakespeare's writting and how he managed to write so beautifully. I have never been able to pin point it but Shakespeare is some of the only poetry I enjoy reading. He presents moral quesions in such a way to make you think about that issue, the relevence in his world and the relevence in today's world. He was brilliant and that is the reason I enrolled in this course, which is all Shakespeare, my only disadvantage is being an independent study student and missing out on meaningful class room discussions that help me see not onlt my perspective but other readers perspective too. I feel that understanding all points of view and hearing al points of view allows myself as the reader to expand my opinions and also to shed light on an issue someelse might have overlooked and vice versa. Again thank you and I hope we can continue this discussion. I will post more of my ideas later today or so, I need to collect my thoughts and write them so they make sense and aren't a scrambled mess.
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Figurative language in Henry V 6 years 9 months ago #1540

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kelcb22 WROTE: Also comment on his success in using sound patterns to give these ideas artistic emphasis.

The major point that's often forgotten, or relegated to a position of somewhat negligible importance, is that Shakespeare was Actor first, playwright/dramatist second, and co-producer of a successful theatrical enterprise, third. The idea that what really amounts to the literary by-product of his endeavors should be the one-sided focus of our study owes its thanks to hundreds of years of scholarly attention (not wrong, however misleading and many times unfortunate it has been, and still can be, when the name 'Shakespeare ' is spoken.) The intention was to create great theatre--good enough that someone might be interested enough to pay to hear it--not masterpieces of lit destined to gather the dust of revered, but ignored, relics in some forgotten section of the library. Point of fact, for many years the plays were considered unfit specimens for serious publication or admittance into ANY library, and if not for actor compatriots Hemmings and Condell (responsible for publication of the first "collected edition" of his work in the First Folio) we might not have been bored to death over the years with watered down, "literary-proper", edited English Teacher renditions of what Shakespeare actually wrote. Then again, without all of the aforementioned involvement, we might not even have a semblance of what his audiences went to Hear. That's the way they referred to a visit to the theatre--"will you hear the play today?"

Hamlet: Will the King heare this peece of Worke?
Polonius: And the Queen too, and that presently.
Ham: Bid the Players make hast.
He wrote his plays with a fixed eye on performance values having to do with the arrangement of words and sounds (embedded clues for the actors; since there were no directors as we know them). Although the terms alliteration, assonance, antithesis, metaphor, onomatopoeia, hyperbole, iambic pentameter,etc.,etc., have much to do with poesy, they have just as much to do with living, breathing, dramatic translation. One of his very useful tools was not only the Antithesis of ideas, but also the Antithetical ebb and flow of point/counterpoint balance within the line itself. His work is rife with it. --probably the most famous example is : "To be, or not to be, that is the Question:".

Also notice the spellings and capitalization--dutifully "emended" over the years, as well as the fact that the above example neither scans as iambic pentameter nor even has ten beats in the line, ending on a "weak" 11th beat.--IE.-"I've got more to say, folks, don't fall asleep yet--oh... and let me make some sort of move here--maybe toward someone standing in the yard-- Will will get pissed if I ignore the colon." (Will used a lot more of them and a lot fewer of the editors fave: the exclamation point).

When looking for how impressively the line or speech might move aurally in Lear, (and it is poetic/dramatic-rich) one needs either a Folio copy or a "good" Quarto copy, and preferably both, AND the Guts to read the lines Out Loud, attempting the written emphasis at the same time. This will begin to bring it back alive. Copies are readily available on the Net--but make sure NO emendations in spellings,verse structure,punctuation, or Caps have been performed (unless of course it's a blatantly obvious typo)There's tons more in Shakespeare's Form--the main reason the busy bees are still at "fixing" it--but this is a good start on Hearing what he seems to have very much intended us to hear--AS we read. Give it a try. Compare it to your present text. Why start out from a homogenized hole?
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Figurative language in Henry V 6 years 9 months ago #1541

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Ok thanks I also have another question, the last assignment I submitted was about the figurative language in Hamlet (same format of this assignment and similar questions) The feedback I recieved from my instructor said " Although you identify many figures of speech, you dont say what their effects are or how they work with other features of form. Don't forget this important part of literary analysis." I emailed the instructor to ask what is meant by that and I haven't recieved a reply in over a month. I don't understand what he meant by that. If it would help I could post part of the assignment I submitted. I am obviously doing the identifying figures of speech correctly but I don't know how to comment on their effects or how they work with other features of form
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Figurative language in Henry V 6 years 9 months ago #1543

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Subject--figurative language--Hamlet
---Although you identify many figures of speech, you don't say what their effects are or how they work with other features of form. Don't forget this important part of literary analysis."
_________________________________________________
I'm not sure what the instructor is referring to as "form" either, since it's said to be an imp. part of Literary analysis, which, in my opinion it certainly is; but even most actor/directors, never mind "English" teachers of Shakespeare, I've known or with whom I've worked, haven't been aware of 'form' in the same sense that I use it--this includes professors of theatre at the university level. It's far more well known in England-the RSC- and parts of Europe.Sir Peter Hall has written a book on it, but American actors are resistant to anything that doesn't come out of the Actors' Studio Sphere-(-Method) until they're forced to pay attention to something else. Maybe I'm not aware of how it could be catching on ?
The instructor might be speaking of the structure- -blank verse/iambs, rhyming couplets, verse, prose,etc.
_???___________________________

If it would help I could post part of the assignment I submitted.
___________________________________________
It might.
Last Edit: 6 years 9 months ago by Joe M..
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Figurative language in Henry V 6 years 9 months ago #1545

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I will see if i can dig that paper out and I will try it post it tomorrow. I was very confused by his comments as well, I personally thought the paper was going to fulfill all of the qualifications of the assignment. I am hoping the instructor will let me know what he means by "Although you identify many figures of speech, you don't say what their effects are or how they work with other features of form. Don't forget this important part of literary analysis." I have asked some of my old teachers and no one can seem to tell me what that means. If I get a reply email I will let you know. What you are saying about structure seems to make sense though
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