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TOPIC: On stage/ Impressive change of inner and outer attitude

On stage/ Impressive change of inner and outer attitude 1 year 4 months ago #6754

King Lear on the theatre- stage last week:
I was impressed by the way the character of King Lear was represented.
In the beginning King Lear appears as a very self- confident, egocentric ruler, who is sure that he is the centre of (his!) world. He loves his power, his honour and this kind of respect other people and especially his daughters have to show him. He loves himself and asks his daughters to reflect this form of love. This attitude is underlined by his appearance as a distinguished looking businessman acting with arrogant manners.
The more he looses his power, his honour and especially the respect his daughters Goneril and Regan and the servants refuse him, the more he leaves his conception of being the centre of this world. In his confusion he speaks about more than “nonsense”- he begins to become aware of the nature, the true world in which he has to live now and this nature, which rules him now. His outer appearance changes more and more in the same way his inner attitude changes. In the end he is a man without any power, any honour and any respect by his daughters Goneril and Regan and the servants – but a man who does not longer love himself, but another human being – his daughter Cordelia, who loves him without any attributes of a king. His outer appearance is wretched. But in this theatre- play at the end Lear seems to be a man with another form of wealth before he dies: He is sure about his love to his daughter Cordelia and his daughter’s love to him.
Annette
Last Edit: 1 year 4 months ago by Annette Schmitter. Reason: Another presentation of the topic
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