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TOPIC: Who is it that can tell me -

Who is it that can tell me - 6 years 6 months ago #1905

Is it Tie-man or Tee-man of Athens?

Regards, Charles
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Who is it that can tell me - 6 years 6 months ago #1908

It's "Tie-mon". I can't remember the reason at the moment why that conclusion was reached, but I can look into it.
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Who is it that can tell me - 6 years 6 months ago #1910

And in The Winter's Tale it's Pau-lye-na, not Pauleena! :-)
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Who is it that can tell me - 6 years 6 months ago #1911

  • akfarrar
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Oh, lodye lodye!

It's whatever you want - we are dealing with 'accent' and it certainly wasn't fixed in Shakespeare's time (or later), it ain't fixed now and it won't be fixed tomorrow.

If I am playing an upper-crusty Brit - I might cut the 'ey' to a very short 'i' - in which case it'll b' T'm'n -

If eyem playin a bit of a yokyl i'llll draw out the eye - It'll be TYYYEMon.

Certainly no correct one on this!

RP (the not-the-Queen's-English) has seriously shifted on this one.
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Who is it that can tell me - 6 years 6 months ago #1925

Thanks for the feedback - I guess both work, but sometimes it's the little things that worry me. As an example, for a long time I refused to mention Holinshed's name because I didn't know if it was:

Holins-hed -or- Holin-shed

I've since learned that Holin lived in a shed ;o)

Regards, Charles
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Who is it that can tell me - 6 years 5 months ago #1927

:-) Yeah, I always imagined it as Holin-shed, but, as I recall, almost every time I've heard it pronounced, it has been Holins-hed. Still not sure which is correct, if any.
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Who is it that can tell me - 6 years 5 months ago #1929

  • Joe M.
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The wisdom of Sholom Aleichem seems to apply here.
Avram: "He's right? AND He's right?-How can they both be right?" Tevye: "You know, you are also right."

Apparently, Holingz ed or Holin shed or Holins head are all correct.

I assume the name is derived from what seems to be its original form:
Hollings head, or 'hollingz hed' or 'hollingz ed'. One encyclopedia spells it Holinshed, but indicates it phonetically as hol inz -hed. Two different dictionaries show both the names (Hollingshead & Holinshed) to be interchangeable in usage, pronunciation , and spelling. --depends, I guess, on which district of old Luddstown you happen to find yourself in at the moment--or sometimes, as was noted by The Inimitable Boz , which block.
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