PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
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TOPIC: Proteus

Proteus 6 years 6 months ago #6757

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Proteus 1 year 4 months ago #6758

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nice article very useful
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Proteus 1 year 3 months ago #6759

Proteus is also a character in Greek mythology; a sea-god, who changes his form, much as the sea does. Anyone who has spent time on a boat realizes how the sea changes. It seems that the Play: The Two Gentlemen of Verona is about the inner mutability of humans. Our inner life changes all the time. We see this when we are honest with ourselves, and realize that we have not as much control as we like to think we have. We see the process of thinking that Proteus goes through which leads him to throw over Julia for Sylvia in Act 2 scene 6 : " To leave my Julia, shall I be forsworn; To love fair Sylvia, shall I be forsworn; To wrong my friend, I shall be much foresworn. ..... If I keep them , I needs must lose myself; If I lose them, thus find I by their loss. " He follows this last idea and tries to find " I " , by being unfaithful to his friends; and we see the results of this decision later in the Play; he regrets it profoundly. Act 5 scene 4 Proteus says " My shame and guilt confounds me " In the Shakespeare Plays we see many thinking processes exemplified, and we see the results of that particular type of reasoning later on in the Play. We may find many of the same types of thinking in ourselves, and it is a great advantage to have examples from the Plays to help us to observe ourselves honestly, and learn on our life's journey. As humans we do not come with an instruction manual. As we study the Plays we begin to see within ourselves examples of the circumstances which the characters in the Plays portray. It may help us not to fall so easily into difficulties.
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