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Timon of Athens :: Characters

Timon of Athens Characters

Timon of Athens is a rich man of Athens with absolutely no sense of scale, either in prosperity or in misery. 

 
 

Lucius is a lord of Athens, one of Timon’s flattering friends who is only generous to rich people. 

 
 

Lucullus is a lord of Athens, one of Timon’s flattering and not particularly generous friends, though he does send him some hunting hounds when he invites Timon to hunt with him. 

 
 

Sempronius is a lord of Athens, one of Timon’s flattering friends, and a very proud man who considers himself insulted to be asked for help after others instead of first. 

 
 

Ventidius is a friend of Timon’s who tends to live beyond his means, to the extent that he ends up in prison for debt. 

 
 

Alcibiades is a young Athenian captain, a great soldier who has won many victories for Athens. 

 
 

Apemantus is a professional cynic, a snarling, nasty man who insults everybody he meets without appearing to derive any pleasure from doing so. 

 
 

Flavius is Timon’s Steward, and the head of his household, and the man best aware of just how much his master spends. 

 
 

Flaminius is one of Timon’s servants, sent to request fifty talents from Lucullus when Timon’s debts catch up with him. 

 
 

Servilius is one of Timon’s servants, sent to request fifty talents from Lucius when Timon’s debts catch up with him. 

 
 

Lucilius is one of Timon’s servants, a younger man who has served his master well for some years now.

 
 

Timon's Servant is sent to request fifty talents of Sempronius when Timon’s debts catch up with him.

 
 

Caphis is the servant of a Senator who also dabbles in usury and has lent Timon a great deal of money. 

 
 

Philotus is the servant of one of Timon’s creditors, sent to recover the debt, though he has little hope of doing so.

 
 

Titus is the servant of one of Timon’s creditors, sent to ask for repayment on that debt. 

 
 

Hortensius is the servant of one of Timon’s creditors, sent to recover a debt. 

 
 

A Poet is a verse-maker who lives by acquiring the support (and therefore money) of rich men whom he praises in his poems. 

 
 

A Painter is a starving artist in need of patronage who, along with his fellow crawler the Poet, hopes to get money off Timon by flattering him. 

 
 

A Jeweller [possibly named Titus] is a flattering man who brings Timon a jewel, knowing that the latter will buy it no matter the cost.

 
 

A Merchant is a flattering man who attends Timon’s feast and is well aware of what Apemantus is like.

 
 

An Old Athenian is a rich, upright, honorable and crusty old man with a healthy respect for his own position in life. 

 
 

Timon's Page is sent to bring two letters, one to Timon and one to Alcibiades. 

 
 

A Fool speaks truth in riddles, and has a good mocking tongue. 

 
 

Phrynia is one of Alcibiades’s mistresses, accompanying him and his army as he marches on Athens. 

 
 

Timandra is one of Alcibiades’s mistresses, accompanying him and his army as he marches on Athens. 

 
 

Cupid is one of the Ladies who come to present a masque of the five senses at Timon’s feast, and explains the idea to Timon.

 
 

The First Stranger has his ear to the ground and knows what is happening to Timon’s fortunes before some of Timon’s supposed friends do. 

 
 

The Second Stranger (Hostilius) is shocked that Lucullus has refused to help Timon out, and gossips to Lucius about it. 

 
 

The Third Stranger is appalled at Lucius’s refusal to help Timon.

 
 

Varro's First Servant works for a usurer to whom Timon owes a great deal of money (3,000 crowns), who is sent to recover a sum that’s been due for six weeks. 

 
 

Varro's Second Servant works for a usurer to whom Timon owes a great deal of money (3,000 crowns), and is sent along with Varro’s First Servant to recover the sum when the latter is unsuccessful in getting the money back on his own. 

 
 

Lucullus’s Servant is trusted by his master, but not so much that Lucullus will attempt to offer a bribe in his presence.

 
 

First Lady Amazon Masker is one of the Ladies who come to present a masque of the five senses at Timon’s feast, and disclaims his praise.

 
 

Lady Amazon Maskers [mute roles] are a group of women who come to present a masque of the five senses at Timon’s feast.

 
 

The First Lord is an Athenian gentleman, one of Timon’s innumerable bootlickers, who thinks nothing of simply walking off the street to eat at Timon’s table and receiving rich gifts from him with no more repayment than flattery. 

 
 

The Second Lord is an Athenian gentleman, one of Timon’s innumerable bootlickers, who thinks nothing of simply walking off the street to eat at Timon’s table and receiving rich gifts from him with no more repayment than flattery. 

 
 

The Third Lord is one of Timon’s innumerable bootlickers, who refuses to help him out when he is in need and is shocked at Timon’s reaction. 

 
 

The Fourth Lord is one of Timon’s innumerable bootlickers, who refuses to help him out when he is in need and is shocked at Timon’s reaction. 

 
 

A Messenger from Ventidius comes to beg Timon to pay off the debt when Ventidius is arrested for non-repayment of five talents, a huge sum.

 
 

Lucius’s Servant is sent by his master to recover some money from Timon, and is well aware that the man is essentially bankrupt. 

 
 

The First Bandit does not see why a ruined man should be left any money at all, but insists he is not a thief. 

 
 

The Second Bandit has heard that Timon has some treasure on him and brings his fellows to find him, but insists that he is not a thief. 

 
 

The Third Bandit has seen Timon before; like his fellows, he insists that he is not a thief. 

 
 

The First Senator is an old man, one of the members of government who refuses to help Timon when he is in need.

 
 

The Second Senator is an old man, one of the members of government who refuses to help Timon when he is in need, and refuses to pay any attention to Alcibiades’s pleas for one of his men’s life. 

 
 

The Third Senator practices usury on the side, and is deeply concerned about how much money Timon spends. 

 
 

The Fourth Senator is terrified of the arrival of Alcibiades’s army.

 
 

Isidore’s Servant is the servant of a usurer to whom Timon owes a great deal of money. 

 
 

A Messenger informs the Senate of just how bad the situation with Alcibiades’s approaching army is, and also informs them that Alcibiades too is seeking Timon’s support.

 
 

A Soldier is sent by Alcibiades to find Timon and ask for his support in his attack on Athens, but only finds Timon’s grave. 

 
 
 
 
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