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TOPIC: Hamlet opens the gates

Hamlet opens the gates 9 years 3 weeks ago #1375

  • Mike thomas
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ref Hamlet:

Purely for the sake of interest, here's a little trick involving the two characters Francisco and Barnardo. They are the two guards who open the play, and we know that although Francisco is on guard duty, Barnaordo makes the challenge etc. In other words, right at the very first line something is confused or mixed up. The confusion will continue in the character of Hamlet throughout the play.

Here's the trick:

The two names FRANCISCO and BARNARDO make FRANCIS BACON ROARD.

The word roar'd is a valid Elizabethan spelling, and the apostrophe is assumd.

* Most things involving Sir Francis Bacon come in doubles. *

The letters ROARD also make something else: ADO R R

where ADO refers to the play and R R is an alpha-numeric reference (17 17) to a letter count (dialogue only) in the opening line of the play Much ado, e.g:


Leonato. I LEARNE BY THIS LETT, ....... 17 letters, after immediately meeting a man who roars.

The name Leonato is in fact made from two Latin words:

Leo and nato. The first means Lion, the second means swim.

The letter count uses the number 17, and begins at the first letter of dialogue: the 17 letters counted are: I LEARNE BY THIS LETT

It can be shown that the sum of all the abc values of those 17 letters is 194.

Moreover, it can be shown that if the same is applied to the letters FRANCIS BACON the result is 100. But so is the word SONNETS.

By subtraction 194 minus 100 = 94 and this is a reference to Sonnet 94 which says:

They that haue powre to hurt, and will doe none,
That doe not do the thing, they most do showe,
Who mouing others, are themselues as stone,
Vnmooued, could, and to temptation slow:
They rightly do inherrit heauens graces,
And husband natures ritches from expence,
They are the Lords and owners of their faces,
Others, but stewards of their excellence:
The sommers flowre is to the sommer sweet,
Though to it selfe, it onely liue and die,
But if that flowre with base infection meete,
The basest weed out-braues his dignity:
For sweetest things turne sowrest by their deedes,
Lillies that fester, smell far worse then weeds.

Sonnet 94


If one takes note of the spelling of the word doe and do, and looks at the original play's title in the Folio they would see Much Adoe rather than Much Ado.

Note also that there are two does and two dos.

Remember those two letters R R? R was 17 in the old alphabet.

Counting from the first They we find at 17th (line 2: they) and at 34th (line 5: They) therefore two seventeens are used.

The sequence of seventeens breaks down at the 51st count (line 7: owners ), as only began with two letters R R, but where line 6 begins with They, and is correctly in sequence, the same line ends with GRACES, which, according to the same principle of abc numbering, is 51.

Because the number of the name FRANCIS is the same as for the word GRACE it follows that FRANCIS S is the same as GRACES.

Now, the letter S is 18, and Sonnet 18 begins with these three lines:

Shall I compare thee to a Summers day?
Thou art more louely and more temperate:
Rough windes do shake the darling buds of Maie,

And the first letter is also an S.

Counting eighteen letters from that S ( which is 18 ) we land on do (remember do?).

It happens that the number of DO is 18........



Earlier, I said that the name Leonato means Lion swim in Latin. This points to the play Julius Caesar, and his swimming in river.

Although there is a Lioness in the play, this time it's the river which roar'd.

It is possible to show that Sir Francis Bacon hides in this play also, in a similar manner to how he hides in Hamlet.

I could go on to show that all the above is not coincidence but who would really understand it?

Anyone who wishes to verify the above numbers are welcome to download my calculator. It saves much hassle.


Instructions included. Source code in VBasic is also free on request.

many regards
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Hamlet opens the gates 8 years 11 months ago #1496

  • Joe M.
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QUOTE: <<<I could go on to show that all the above is not coincidence but who would really understand it?>>>

Aren't you asking yourself the same question? I don't doubt the accuracy of what you're calculating, nor do I believe it to be mere coincidence that you were able to arrive at the conclusion you have. Sonnet 18 begins with S...so do 62, 65, 75, 78, 89, 91, 93, 96,...Is that coincidence? How about Chance? Or can something be found in each of Them to link to the same sort of reasoning or meaning or intent? Further, what can be more "calculated" than "finding the answer" ever so abruptly; wherever it lies in relation to where it's needed to support the point that follows it --e.g. discovering synchronous aspects after the fact in partial words ("LETT"). This is Aristotelian logic (already unsound from the habits passed to us by Thomas Aquinas) turned on its head. This is going to sound flip, but honestly, it's the only way to put it : How do you suppose whoever might have been responsible had the ability to, in effect, reverse-engineer what you just laid out above? Because in the invention of such protracted and labyrynthine crypto-mathematics, it seems the act of downloading your calculator would have been a necessary first step for them as well.
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Hamlet opens the gates 7 years 8 months ago #2383

  • Mike thomas
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Hi Willshill

First let me thank you for your interest in my findings. I take all that you have said on board, and I will post a fuller rebuttle soon.

I understand full well how complex it all looks, and believe me, if I did not think I had something, I would rather have left the subject long ago.

In retrospect, I went overboard when I wrote "It can be shown that the sum of all the abc values of those 17 letters is 194" and should have used less numbers etc.

You said "Sonnet 18 begins with S...so do 62, 65, 75, 78, 89, 91, 93, 96,...Is that coincidence?" and of course there are plenty of sonnets which begin with an S. The point is that in the 18th sonnet, which begins with the 18th letter of the abc, a count of 18 words lands on DO, which, according to the abc of the period, results in two numbers 4 and 14, which therefore makes the word DO equivilent to 18. Chance?

As a matter of interest - and this might never be answered - but if someone had encoded the texts in some similar fashion, what would be considered proof?

I mean: a line of text might be found that points to another line, and so on, in a series of same numbers, such as Sonnet 8, line 8, word 8 points to the 8th word in Sonnet 88, and that word is "eight".

I doubt if even that result would be acceptable. It seems to me that if something is extremely complex, it cannot be accepted mainly because of the complexity alone.

The thing is far more complex than even you might imagine, I have been at this for some years, and I really think there is something worth searching for.

I suppose you know of the letters Mr.W.H printed on the Sonnets dedication page? If not there are plenty of words out there spilled in fruitless attempts to resolve the thing. Here is an example of that complexity: The dedication mentions our "ever-living poet" in relation to those letters, here's one of three answers to the problem:

H w M r or, in Greek letters: HwMEP which is a reasonable likeness to HOMER. (Doh?)

The letters form the sound like Homer, and that's what the word sonnet is derived from - sound.

I said there are three answers, the other two are just as easily extracted. Why three solutions? I might show you some time.

Not for reasons of meanness did Ben Jonson make that remark about the Greek and Latin languages.

The persons who made that complexity, send those who take the bait, on a kind of odyssey through all the texts. The modus is presented inside the top text, rather like the Wooden horse hides the Greeks.

Anyway, I ramble needlessly, thanks again, and I look forward to your response my friend

regards.
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