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TOPIC: Some Baconian Evidence - Misc.

Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4398

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First, consider what many others that have read closely both Bacon and Shakespeare have said (this is only a partial list, it could be more than twice as long):

In conversation he could assume the most different characters, and speak the language proper to each, with a facility which was perfectly natural.- David Mallet, Bacon biographer

In his book, "Francis Bacon, His Career and Thought" Fulton Anderson says certainly the Shakespeare works are not in Bacon's usual style. But we must remember, he adds, Bacon could write in many different styles at will. Anderson notes that when trying to bring Essex back into Elizabeth's favor Bacon had successfully composed feigned correspondence supposedly written by Essex and by Bacon's brother Anthony in which he imitated the styles of each perfectly. He even wrote letters to Elizabeth, says Anderson, at the bidding of Essex in exact imitation of the Earl. And when James succeeded to the throne after the death of Elizabeth, Bacon addressed a letter to James in exact imitation of the ponderous style of James.

"A high perfection, attainable only by use, and treating with every man in his respective profession, and what he was most vers'd in. So as I have heard him entertain a Country Lord in the proper terms relating to Hawks and Dogs. And at another time out-Cant a Loundon Chirurgeon (Surgeon). Thus he did not only learn himself, but gratifie such as taught himn; who looked upon their Callings as honoured through his Notice..." Francis Osborn, in his "Advice to a Son," writing of Bacon

"My conceit of his person was never increased toward him by his place, or honors: but I have and do reverence him, for the greatness that was only proper to himself, in that he seemed to me ever, by his work, one of the greatest men, and most worthy of admiration, that had been in many ages." --Ben Johnson

The fire, the wine, the men! and in the midst, Thou stands't as if some Mysterie thou didst! ---Ben Jonson 1620 addressing Bacon during a tribute on his 60th birthday

He who have filled up all numbers and performed that in our tongue which may be compared or preferred either to insolent Greece or haughty Rome...In short, within his view, and about his times , were all the wits born that could honor a language or help study. Now things daily fall; wits grow downward and eloquence grows backward, so that he may be named and stand as the mark and acme of our language. -- Ben Jonson

I am one of the many who have never been able to bring the life of William Shakespeare and the plays of Shakespeare within planetary space of each other. Are there any two things in the world more incongruous? Had the plays come down to us anonymously, had the labor of discovering the author been imposed upon after generations, I think we could have found no one of that day but Francis Bacon to whom to assign the crown. In this case it would have been resting now on his head by almost common consent.- Dr. W. H. Furness, the eminent American scholar in a letter to Nathaniel Holmes, Oct. 29, 1866

A Dictionary of the English language might be compiled from Bacon's works alone.- -- Samuel Jonson

The first time I heard Bacon mentioned as the possible author of the plays and poems, the idea lit up in my brain , and I felt certain that it could not have been the Mummer...... The moment it was suggested that Bacon had written them, I felt as many must have felt when they heard for the first time that the earth goes round the sun. Things began to get concentric again; hitherto they had all been eccentric. --George Moore in a Letter to R. L. Eagle

Among so many virtues that made this great man commendable, prudence, as the first of all the moral virtues, and that most necessary of those of his profession, was that which shone in him the most brightly. Never was there man who so loved equity, or so enthusiastically worked for the public good as he. Vanity, avarice, and ambition, vices that too often attach themselves to great honors, were to him quite unknown, and if he did a good action it was not from a desire of fame, but simply because he could not do otherwise. His good qualities were entirely pure, without being clouded by the admixture of any imperfections, and the passions that form usually the defects in great men in him only served to bring out his virtues.--Pierre Amboise, 1631

Thus it is easier to prove that if Shakspere wrote the literature we have an instance of a stupendous miracle than it is to prove that, although Bacon possessed all the qualifications , he might still have refrained from writing it. In the one case we should have to exercise that form of faith described as "believing what you know to be untrue," on the other there is no tax whatever upon one's faculty of credence.-- H. Crouch Batchelor from Francis Bacon Wrote Shakespeare

The wisdom displayed in Shakespeare is equal in profoundness to the great Lord Bacon's Novum Organum. -- Hazlitt

There is an understanding manifested in the construction of Shakespeare's plays equal to that in Bacon's Novum Organum -- Carlyle

The philosophical writings of Bacon are suffused and saturated with Shakespeare's thought. -- Gerald Massey

Surely the Essays must be numbered among the few books that deserve to be chewed and digested. Rarely shall you find so much meat, so admirably dressed and flavored, in so small a dish. Bacon abhors padding, and disdains to waste a word; he offers us infinite riches in a little phrase; each of these essays gives in a page or two the distilled subtlety of a master mind on a major issue of life. It is difficult to say whether the matter more excels; for here is language as supreme in prose as Shakespeare's is in verse. It is a style like sturdy Tacitus', compact yet polished; and indeed some of its conciseness is due to skillful adaptation of Latin idiom and phrase. But its wealth of metaphor is characteristically Elizabethan, and reflects the exuberance of the Renaissance; no man in English literature is so fertile in pregnant and pithy comparisons.--Will Durant, The Story of Philosophy

Sir Walter Raleigh once spoke of him by way of comparison, "That the Earl of Salisbury was an excellent speaker, but no good penman; that the Earl of Northampton (the Lord Henry Howard) was an excellent penman, but no good speaker; but that Sir Francis Bacon was eminent in both."

I infer from this sample that Bacon had all the natural faculties which a poet wants; a fine ear for metre, a fine feeling for imaginative effect in words, and a vein of poetic passion....Truth is that Bacon was not without the fine phrensy of a poet. --James Spedding, "Works "

Lord Bacon was a poet. His language has a sweet and majestic rhythm, which satisfies the sense, no less than the almost superhuman wisdom of his philosophy satisfies the intellect. It is a strain which distends and then bursts the circumference of the reader's mind and pours itself forth together with it into the universal element with which it has perpetual sympathy. He is the greatest philosopher-poet since Plato. -- Percy Shelley, the poet

I shall give you Measure for Measure.--Tobie Matthew in a letter to Bacon

He seems to have written his Essays with the pen of Shakespeare.--Alexander Smith

"It will go near to pose any other nation of Europe, to muster out in any age, four men, who in so many respects should excel four such as we are able to show them: Cardinal Wolsey, Sir Thomas More, Sir Philip Sidney, and Sir Francis Bacon. The fourth was a creature of incomparable abilities of mind, of a sharp and catching apprehension, large and faithful memory, plentiful and sprouting, deep and solid judgment, for as such as might concern the understanding part. A man so rare in knowledge, of so many several kinds endued with the facility and felicity of expressing it all in so eloquent, significant, so abundant, and yet so choice and ravishing, a way of words, of metaphors and allusions as, perhaps, the world hath not seen, since it was a world. I know this may seem a great hyperbole, and strange kind of excess of speech, but the best means of putting me to shame will be, for you to place any other man of yours by this of mine." - Tobie Mathew, friend of F. Bacon

It is my belief that Love's Labour's Lost took immediate inspiration from the Gray's Inn revels of 1594-5. It is very curious indeed to remember that the speeches of the Counsellors in Gesta Grayorum have been attributed to Francis Bacon, and if that attribution is correct, and if I am correct in hearing echoes of those speeches in Love's Labour's Lost, then the "civil war of wits" in that play may be, in one of its aspects, a reflection of some friendly crossing of swords between the two greatest wits of the age, Shakespeare and Bacon.--Frances Yates, a Stratfordian ; in the book A Study of Love's Labour's Lost

.......There has been a great deal of scholarship gone into both sides of this issue. One of the things that has convinced me the most is that those who believe in Shakespeare don't seem to have the same kind of knowledge of facts and the depth of perception. They're mostly denying Bacon because--well--most people don't think so, therefore it isn't true. Shakespeareans are very defensive , often very superficial in their treatment of what is put out by Baconians.---Arthur Young 1987 The Shakespeare/Bacon Controversy

With this, readers should at least begin to acknowledge that many others thought that Bacon is fully capable of writing in the style of Shakespeare.
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4401

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Some more observations of others:

The poetical faculty was powerful in Bacon's mind but not, like his wit, so powerful as occasionally to usurp the place of reason, and to tyrannise over the whole man. No imagination was ever at once so strong and to thoroughly subjugated. It never stirred but at a signal from good sense...In truth, much of Bacon's life was passed in a visionary world, amidst things as strange as any that are described in the Arabian tales. Lord Macauley

A kind of melody of speech belongs to Bacon; [his ear is exact] and counts its seconds like the pendulum of a clock. J.W.Taverner

In Bacon's mode of writing there is that remarkable quality which gives the style of Shakespeare such a strongly marked individuality; that is, a combination of the intellectual and imaginative, the closest reasoning, the boldest metaphor. T.B.Shaw in Outlines of English Literature (1849)

His style is also the reflection of a poetical mind which adorns its logic with an imagery, picturesque, piquant, and full of metaphors, similes and analogies, sometimes strained, always suggestive. Thomas Case in the World Classic edition of Bacon's Advancement of Learning.

H.A. Taine in his History of English Literature (1871) wrote: In this band of scholars, dreamers and inquirers appears the most comprehensive, sensible, originative of the minds of the age, Francis Bacon, a great luminous intellect, one of the finest of this poetic progeny who, like his predecessors, was naturally disposed to clothe his ideas in the most splendid dress...He has thought in the manner of artists and poets, and he speaks after the manner of prophets and seers.

Shakespeare is as astonishing for the exuberance of his genius in abstract notions, and for the depth of his analytical and philosophic insight, as for the scope and minuteness of his poetic imagination. It is as if into a mind poetical in form there had been poured all the matter that existed in the mind of his contemporary Bacon. In Shakespeare's plays we have thought, history, exposition, philosophy, all within the round of the poets. The only difference between him and Bacon sometimes is that Bacon writes an essay and calls it his own, while Shakespeare writes a similar essay and puts in into the mouth of a Ulysses or a Polonius. David Masson in Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and other Essays (1874)

He was also a philosopher. In the construction of Shakespeare's dramas is an understanding manifested equal to that in Bacon's Novum Organum. Thomas Carlyle

Bacon's similes, for their aptness and their vividness, are of a kind of which Shakespeare or Goethe or Richter might have been proud. Prof. J.S. Blackie (1886)

His style varied almost as much as his handwriting but was influenced more by the subject matter than by youth or old age. Few men have shown equal versatility in adapting their language to the slightest change of circumstance and purpose. his style depended on whether he was composing a State paper, pleading in a State trial, magnifying the prerogative, extolling truth, discussing studies, exhorting a judge, sending a New Year present, or sounding a trumpet to prepare the way for the Kingdom of Man over nature. E.A. Abbott

His constant practice in every kind of literary composition and in the meditation which constant literary composition sometimes tempts its practitioners to dispense with, enabled him to write on a vast variety of subjects and in many different styles. Prof. George E.B. Saintsbury in his Short history of English Literature (1898)

It has always struck me as extraordinary, and almost as a problem to be explained, how the two greatest Englishmen belonged to one era, nearly the same interval of years, how they lived, as it were, side by side, face to face, yet, so far as we could learn, were strangers to each other, the one a poetical philosopher, the other a philosophical poet. W. Carew Hazlitt, a Stratfordian
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4405

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Details on the similarities in Bacon's and Shakespeare's writing styles:

A. Antithesis: this is the contrast of ideas expressed by parallelisms of strongly contrasted words.
"But day by night and night by day oppressed" Sonnet 28
"Time was I had honour without leisure; and now I have leisure without honour". Bacon

"Or I shall short my promise by lengthening my return". Cymbeline 1.7.200
"I, who desire to live to study, may be driven to study to live". Bacon

N.B.Cockburn says (and I'm paraphrasing): "Antithesis was in vogue in the Elizabethan era, especially in the pre-Shakespearian period before about 1580. John Lyly used it quite often. But I know of no Elizabethan (or other) writer of poetry or prose who pursued antithesis as persistently and adroitly as did Bacon and Shake-Speare. Their addiction to it is so intense as to constitute almost a mental disorder; and sometimes they strain language to achieve it. "

B. Metaphors and Similes:
"His mind was wonderfully quick in perceiving analogies of all sorts. But...he sometimes appears strangely deficient in the power of distinguishing rational from fanciful analogies". "Indeed, he possessed this faculty, or this faculty possessed him, to a morbid degree". Lord Macauley on Bacon.
"There is perhaps no [prose] author so metaphorical as Bacon; his whole style is saturated with metaphor". T.B. Shaw in Outlines of English Literature (1849)

"Shakespeare perceived a thousand distant and singular relations between the objects which met his view. he had the habit of that learned subtlety which sees and animates everything, and leaves no hint of resemblances unnoticed". Francois Guizot

"The swift movement from image to image, and the complex fusion of ideas, are typical of Bacon at his best, when the need to realise certain abstract ideas forces him to make a poetical use of language." Quennell and Johnson in A History of English Literature (1972)

C. Vocabulary
"Bacon made a study of comparative philology to show in what points each language excels and in what it fails, so that not only may languages be enriched by mutual exchanges, but also the several beauties of each combined, and thus made to constitute a model speech of itself." Spedding 4.441
"I had often observed, and so have other men of great account, that if he [Bacon] had occasion to repeat another man's words after him, he had an use and faculty to dress them in better vestments and apparel than they had before. So that the author should find his own speech much amended. and yet the substance of it still retained. As it had been natural for him to use good forms". Canon Rawley

D. Both authors found it hard to resist an aphorism, and coined many that have been on men's tongues ever since.

E. Habit of Revision
Shake-Speare and Bacon were both inveterate revisers, even after publication.
"I myself have seen at least twelve copies of the Instauration i]Novum Organum[/i revised year by year, one after the other, and every year altered and amended in the frame thereof, till at least it came to that model in which it was committed to the press. he would suffer no moment of time to slip from him without some present improvement". Canon Rawley

F. Stumbling over Grammar
"..the tangled, elliptical, helter-skelter sentences into which the impetuous imagination of Shakespeare sometimes hurries him". Christopher North
"Bacon's mind, with its fullness and eagerness of thought, was at all times apt to outrun his powers of grammatical expression". Spedding 1.145

G. "Do", "doth", "dost" etc
Both Bacon and Shake-Speare adhered, to their last days, to these expletives before verbs: "When I do count the clock that tells the time". The usage of them though had began to die out at the end of the 16th century.

F.
Carelessness over Detail
"Shake-Speare sometimes seems indifferent to detail. There are quite often loose ends in the plots of the plays, or even inconsistencies in the names of characters and so on. (even giving leeway for inaccurate transcription).
Bacon also was sometimes indifferent to detail. He often misquoted from the classics and other sources.
"We have abundant proof that he [Bacon] was eminently inattentive to details". editor S.H.Reynolds of the Clarendon Press

"...the Law does not care about trivialities; I cannot thread needles so well". Bacon
Last Edit: 7 years 5 months ago by Unfoldyourself.
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4413

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There is a connection between Bacon, Pallas Athena, and Shakespeare. Bacon's muse was Pallas Athena. We know this because a French poet named Jean de la Jessee, (a private secretary to the Duc d'Alencon, and also a close friend of Pierre de Ronsard, the "prince of poets" whom Bacon met while in France) wrote in a letter to Bacon: "Therefore, Bacon, if it chances that my Muse praises someone, it is not because she is eloquent or learned, although your Pallas has taught me better (how to speak)..." .

In Cockburn's (1998) research he found that "The name Pallas was derived from a Greek word meaning "to shake". John Barcla in his Argenis (1634 edition, p 1030) said of Pallas: "She had a golden spear, which the people oft thought the Goddess had shaken, being deceived by the diversity of rays reflecting from the gold's brightness". Pallas was often mentioned by Elizabethan writers (including a number of times by Bacon), and she was well recognised as the spear shaker."

Pallas was also mentioned in the Gray's Inn Revels of Christmas 1594-95 which Bacon helped write. The point is that the name of Shake-Speare would be a perfect pen name for Bacon. And it is this name "SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS" that they were printed under. I think the Oxfordians have a similar argument though I don't know if the Earl of Oxford was directly connected to Pallas like Bacon was.
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4420

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One of the most glaring acts of negligence on Shake-Speare documents is the ignoring in modern Shakespeare biographies of The Northumberland Manuscript. Normally, these writers latch on to every shred of Shakespeare document or even the most unreliable rumor of Will Shakspere's life, just to save any and every historical scrap relating to him.

So we have to wonder with befuddlement why they all seem to stick their heads in the sand rather than to acknowledge an Elizabethan document that has the first known association of any Shakespeare play with the name of William Shakespeare, which is written in full or in part over it at least a dozen times. A document that mentions, not one, but two of the plays, (Richard the second and Richard the third) plus that has an almost exact copy of a line found in The Rape of Lucrece, along with a part line of one of the plays, plus what may have been the original title for 'A Lover's Complaint' that was published with The Sonnets. And even has a shortened version of the word honorificabilitudinitatibus that was used in the play Love's Labor's Lost.

Furthermore, the Shakespeare plays must have been manuscript copies because that's what the bundle of papers held and also because one wouldn't put printed bound books in with a bundle of manuscripts held together with a stitch. The table of contents page of this bundle has been dated to around the Spring of 1597, at which time there were no published plays with the name of William Shakespeare on them. Not all the contents of the bundle were found with it when it was discovered. It seems that the manuscripts were likely removed when it came time to have them printed. For instance, Francis Bacon's essays are listed and next to them is the word "printed", and it was not found in the bundle. This would also explain why the two Shakespeare plays were not found in the bundle--because they too had been removed to prepare for printing, which they were in 1598 with the first use of the name "William Shakespeare" on these plays.

The Northumberland MS was found in 1867 in Northumberland House, hence its name. It is a page of titles of manuscripts that it was once folded around. It also was used to write whole words or phrases, or partial words as if practicing ones penmanship or to test a quill pen.

Considering its uniqueness and historical relevance, you'd think historians would want to put it under glass and display it proudly in a Shakespeare museum.

The problem with it, though, seems to be that most of the manuscripts it held were authored by Francis Bacon. Most were published under his name but some were written by him for others to use. So in several places it says "By Mr. Francis Bacon". It even says this to the left of the entry for the Shakespeare play "Richard the second".

The name William Shakespeare appears several times, and at least in two of these instances there is the word "Your" in front of "William" or in-between and just above "William" and "Shakespeare". So it seems the writer was thinking that these two plays "By Mr. Francis Bacon" should have a note saying "your William Shakespeare". Because of this appearance, we can understand why the historians and biographers don't want this Bacon/Shakespeare document to be talked about too much.

Of course, it also implies that they are not really interested in discovering historical truth as much as they are in maintaining a popular belief. It also implies that they are not really so confident in their belief in the authorship by Will Shakspere of Stratford. Otherwise, they would believe that an open assessment of this document would not threaten their public stance.

A couple of mainstream writers have tried to argue against the suggestion that the document suggests Bacon's authorship of the Shakespeare plays but their points have been countered by Cockburn. So now we have these 'Scholars' that prefer not to examine this manuscript and to not engage this debate. They prefer instead to pretend that this most fascinating historical document doesn't exist.

Here is a link to a photocopy of a transcription of the Northumberland MS.

http://www.sirbacon.org/northumberlandmanuscriptfa.htm

A much more readable copy (for faster computers and internet connections) can be found in a large pdf file (about 14 megabytes) here:

http://sirbacon.org/ResearchMaterial/NM-PRT1.pdf
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4426

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The Northumberland MS found on the link of the previous post was not the original MS. It was cleaned copy reproduced with modern script. The original does look quite old, has the old Elizabethan script, and is much faded. Besides being a page of contents, the original MS was used for testing quill pens or practicing penmanship or for doodling while passing the time. So it had to be carefully examined to pick out the relevant phrases, names, words, etc. These were then placed in the exact same location on a fresh white page for our modern eyes' sake. If you want to see what the original MS actually looks like then download part 2 of the file from the following site (it's also quite large - almost 20 megabytes):

http://sirbacon.org/ResearchMaterial/nm-contents.htm

No one seems to doubt its authenticity, but I think it would be great if some scholar did so it would get more attention in the media. Also, I agree it could be interesting to do parchment and ink analysis on the original. If different inks could actually be distinguished then maybe it could be determined that the same ink on this document was also used on other documents associated with Shake-speare. For instance, the HAND D part of the play Sir Thomas More has not been associated with anyone yet. But there is one handwriting expert that found strong resemblances between it and writing of Francis Bacon. You can examine some comparisons here:

http://www.sirbacon.org/stm14.htm

Another Shake-Speare connection, among hundreds, is a mural of a scene from Venus and Adonis, with the boar

http://www.sirbacon.org/links/carrmural.html

The Baconian Francis Carr had this to say on the mural:
"Yes, there's been a minimum of publicity about the mural at the White Hart Inn in St. Albans (Bacon's county seat that is often mentioned in the Shakespeare plays - at least in Henry VI). The press has done their best to discourage interest in this discovery as well. This important national treasure is now--for the first time--on view to the public. Here is the only contemporary painting in the world of a SHAKESPEARE work. The message of this mural is unmistakable. The painting dates from a few years after the publication of VENUS AND ADONIS in 1593. With its clear Rosicrucian symbolism , it constitutes yet another indication that the author of the Shakespeare plays was Francis Bacon, who lived only two miles away at Gorhambury.

Experts from the Warburg Institute have concluded that the subject is definitely the death scene from VENUS AND ADONIS. The giant painting may cover all three walls of this room. It must have been commissioned for a special purpose, probably for meetings of a Rosicrucian lodge."

Dr. Clive Rouse, a leading art expert and historian, and a specialist in panel paintings, says that this large painting "is a major national treasure. It is priceless. I cannot overestimate the importance of this startling find. There is no Elizabethan wall painting of better artistic quality outside the great houses like Hampton Court."

And, because it was found in Bacon's back yard essentially, instead of in Stratford, the media (not to mention Shakespeare scholars) don't think it's worth mentioning.
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4431

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Groupthink

I realize that one of the difficult things for anyone interested in the Shakespeare authorship question is to be open-minded to non-mainstream un-orthodox views. The human tendency is to conform to someone in a position of authority. This relieves people from the burden of thinking and researching for themselves and dealing with evidence. It's why we have a court system where opposing views can be heard, it is hoped, as impartially as can be. The scholarly community does not uniformly value this ideal. The physical sciences seem to come closest to it since they develop their knowledge base through an experimental methodology that puts to test hypotheses after the gathering of accumulated evidence. The further away scholars get from that research model the more susceptible they can be to a GroupThink that centers around a dominant idea that has been promoted by a small cadre of the most prominent members of the scholarly community, and from which they risk ostracization if they voice any criticism of it.

http://faculty.css.edu/dswenson/web/TWA ... think.html


Let's hope that as many people as possible in this particular historical question of the Shakespeare authorship can try to be open-minded and respectful of opposing views and willing to view any available evidence that is presented.
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4436

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The following touches very briefly on an analysis of Sonnet 107 by N.B.Cockburn in his The Bacon Shakespeare Question (1998). He analyzes eight of the sonnets in relation to the authorship question.

Sonnet 107

Not mine own fears nor the prophetic soul
Of the wide world dreaming on things to come
Can yet the lease of my true love control,
Supposed as forfeit to a confined doom.
The mortal moon hath her eclipse endured,
And the sad augurs mock their own presage,
Incertainties now crown themselves assured,
And peace proclaims olives of endless age.
Now with the drops of this most balmy time
My love looks fresh, and Death to me subscribes,
Since, spite of him, I'll live in this poor rhyme,
While he insults o'er dull and speechless tribes.
And thou in this shalt find thy monument,
When tyrants' crests and tombs of brass are spent.

The 'mortal moon' of the sonnet is the Queen; she was often compared with Diana (alias Cynthia), the moon goddess, as an alternative name for her. "Hath her eclipse endured" means "to have suffered death". The terms are similar to those of Edgar in Lear when he says "Men must endure their going hence (dying)". The sonnet focuses on the fact that before the queen's death there had been widespread fears that the succession would be tempestous. But it proved peaceful.
Bacon used the same phrase for the same purpose when he wrote in his History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh (1622), referring to another Queen Elizabeth, King James' mother-in-law, that "This lady . . . had endured a strange eclipse by the King's flight and temporary depriving from the crown".

No one has found the phrase 'endure an eclipse" anywhere else in the whole range of Elizabethan literature, which suggests that it was unique to Bacon ad Shake-speare.
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4439

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A lot of historical sleuthing has shown that William Shakspere is very unlikely to have been able to write The Comedy of Errors or Love's Labor Lost, and that Bacon was perfectly situated to have written them. The evidence is freely available to examine and too lengthy to post here but I can summarize it.

This I'm borrowing mostly from N.B.Cockburn (1998).

The Comedy of Errors was first performed during the Gray's Inn Revels of Christmas 1594-5. Gray's Inn was one of the law schools in London. At times they held Revels for entertainment and as a kind of rehearsal in the arts of government for later careers for the students. The Revels over Christmas 1594-5 were on an unusually lavish scale. A fairly full account was published in 1688 called "Gesta Grayorum".

One of the entertainments of these Revels was A Comedy of Errors which is generally agreed to be the same as in the Shakespeare First Folio. There are several speeches in the Revels which people are in agreement that they were by Bacon. For instance, Stratfordian A.L.Rowse says "These were written by Bacon with whom such subjects were a characteristic concern." So,

1) already we know that both Bacon and "Shake-Speare" contributed to writing of these same Revels.
2) Then there are several parallels in plot between the play and the rest of the revels. For instance, both of them have a common theme of 'Errors and confusion due to sorcery'.
3) the 'Sorcerer' was probably Bacon, as he was the person most likely responsible for arranging for, planning, and managing the Revels, being also a Treasurer of Gray's Inn at the time. In addition, his name 'Bacon' links him to the philosopher/scientist Roger Bacon who Catholic Church had labeled a 'sorcerer'.
4) Cockburn cites language in Gesta Grayorum that suggests Bacon both hired players to put on the play but also wrote it for them.
5) Besides plot theme similarities, there are many idea and language similarities between the play and the rest of the revels that suggest the play's author knew the content and speeches in the rest of the Revels so that the play could be closely integrated with them.
6) There are a number of legal terms and references in this early play which are much more likely to have been written by a lawyer (Bacon) for other lawyers and law students, than by a non-lawyer (Will Shakspere).
7) The play is Shake-Speare's shortest and this also suggests it was written specifically for the Revels to fit in with them timewise. This implies that it wasn't meant for the theater in general as its length was too short for normal theater productions. And this adds to the reasons why a playwright is not likely to have written it, as it would have been uneconomical to spend the time on it. Playwrights did not seem to want to write plays for a single performance before a private audience. Most plays before Queen Elizabeth or King James had been performed elsewhere first.
8) There is also no record in Gray's Inn's accounts of having paid any playwright for the play, and since they were under tight finances at the time, it's also unlikely that they would have paid an outside playwright for it.
9) Perhaps most importantly, the historical evidence suggests that Gray's Inn had a tradition of writing it's own plays and masques. It's members "excelled in dramatics". In the Elizabethan time period there is only one play performed at one of the Inns of Court that wasn't written by a member there. This was George Chapman in 1613 and even he was said to have lived for a time at Gray's Inn and so even he could be regarded as being one of their members in an informal sense.
10) Finally, Will Shakspere's theater group the Lord Chamberlain's Men were scheduled to play before the Queen on the same night that The Comedy of Errors was played at Gray's Inn, and so it's very unlikely he could have been there for the play. Gesta Grayorum does say that "a Comedy of Errors ...was played by the Players" and that the sorcerer had "foisted a Company of base and common Fellows" to make up our disorders with a Play of Errors and Confusions." But, Cockburn argues, "this seems so offensive a description of the players, even by Elizabethan standards of class consciousness, that one wonders if the company was a mock one, part of the prevailing make-believe, consisting in truth of Inn members who could indulge in such jocular rudeness against themselves." Shakespeare scholars have tried to get around the problem of the Lord's men being at two places at once by inventing the possibility of an error in the dating of the records. But no other errors in such dating has been found and there's no other reason to argue for such an error.

Again, this is just a summary of some of the main evidential points that show there are "low odds" for Will Shakspere's authorship of The Comedy of Errors, and that Bacon is their most likely author. To read two full arguments on this please see either Cockburn's The Bacon Shakespeare Question, Chapter 8, pages 105-128

http://barryispuzzled.com/ncbookpartone.pdf

or Barry Clark's The Bacon Shakespeare Puzzle, chapter 6, pages 124-141 where he has additional evidence and analysis on this play.

http://barryispuzzled.com/shakpuzz.pdf

Here's a paragraph from Clark's chapter:

"Curiously, there is no mention in the Gesta Grayorum of the author of The Comedy of Errors even though it lists the names of some 80 Grays Inn members who played the Officers and Attendants of the Prince. Neither is there a record in the Pension Book of Gray’s Inn of anyone (actor or dramatist) being paid for it while an entry on 11 February 1595 informs us that the sum of 100 marks was to be paid to “the gentlemen [of Gray’s Inn] for their sports and shewes this Shrovetyde at the court before the Queens Majestie” (see §6.11). So Gray’s Inn had a company of actors in existence at the time of the Gray’s Inn revels, payments to them were recorded in the Pension Book, and if the dramatist received no fee then he was most probably an Inns of Court member. Whoever he was, he would have required a sound command of Latin for neither of these two Plautine plays had been printed in English by the end of 1594."

For further 'Strong Evidence" of Bacon's authorship, I'll later post summary evidence for the play Love's Labours Lost.
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Some Baconian Evidence - Misc. 7 years 5 months ago #4444

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Here are a couple of elegies written after Francis Bacon's death in 1626.

At Threnody on the Death of the Most Illustrious and Renowned Personage, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam. [Note: A threnody is a song or hymn of mourning composed or performed as a memorial to a dead person].

"Muses pour forth your perennial waters in lamentations, and let Apollo shed tears (plentiful as the water) which even the Castalian stream contains; for neither would meagre dirges befit so great a loss, nor our moderate drops the mighty monument. The very nerve of genius, the marrow of persuasion, the golden stream of eloquence, the precious gem of concealed literature, the noble Bacon (ah! the relentless warp of the three sisters) has fallen by the fates. O how am I in verse like mine to commemorate you, sublime Bacon! and those glorious memorials of all the ages composed by your genius and by Minerva. With what learned, beautiful, profound matters the Great Instauration is full! With what light does it scatter the darksome moths of the ancient sages! creating from chaos a new wisdom: thus God Himself will with potent hand restore the body laid in the tomb; therefore you do not die (O Bacon !) for the Great Instauration will liberate you from death and darkness and the grave."
R. C., T. C.

Note: Apollo--As the leader of the Muses (Apollon Musagetes) and director of their choir, Apollo functioned as the patron god of music and poetry..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo

The Castalian Spring was where Roman poets came to receive poetic inspiration.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castalian_Spring

Notice also the reference to Minerva (Pallas Athena- the "Spear Shaker")

. . On the Death of the Right Honourable Lord Francis Bacon of Verulam,
Viscount St. Albans, Late Chancellor of England.


" .... The pole of the literary globe is dislocated, where with equal earnestness he adorned the garb of a citizen and the robe of state. As Eurydice (wife of Orpheus) wandering through the shades of Dis (Greek God Pluto) longed to caress Orpheus, so did Philosophy entangled in the subtleties of Schoolmen seek Bacon as a deliverer, with such winged hand as Orpheus (Chief among poets) lightly touched the lyre's strings, the Styx before scarce ruffled now at last bounding, with like hand stroked Philosophy raised high her crest; nor did he with workmanship of fussy meddlers patch, but he renovated her (Philosophy) walking lowly in the shoes of Comedy. After that more elaborately he rises on the loftier tragic buskin, and the Stagirite (like) Virbius comes to life again in Novum Organurn"?

[note: The sock and buskin are two ancient symbols of comedy and tragedy. In Greek theatre, actors in tragic roles wore a boot called a buskin that elevated them above the other actors. The actors with comedic roles only wore a thin soled shoe called a sock.]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sock_and_Buskin

Orpheus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus
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