PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare

Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare 8 years 9 months ago #1777

  • paulrobertwagner
  • paulrobertwagner's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Player
  • Posts: 66
Recently I got in touch with the university professor whose Shakespeare 101 class I took a quarter of a century ago. She seemed really pleased to find out that I was once again studying the Bard, and recommended a number of resources including Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare by Stephen Greenblatt. What can this board tell me about Greenblatt's book?
Last Edit: 8 years 9 months ago by paulrobertwagner.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare 8 years 9 months ago #1780

  • Soothsayer
  • Soothsayer's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Neophyte
  • Posts: 10
Paul - Will in the World is worth your time. The focus of the book is "How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare." At times, Greenblatt gets carried away with his ideas, but for the most part, the book is solid. His comments about Hamlet and King Lear are very good and give you something to think about. The book is in paperback.

There are two other books I also suggest you read, Shakespeare After All by Marjorie Garber and A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare 1599 by James Shapiro. Both are in paperback. Garber devotes a chapter to each play and the section "Suggestions For Further Reading" is very good. Shapiro's focus is on how current events influenced four plays" Henry V, As You Like It, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet. A Year in the Life begins with building the Globe Theatre. I disagree with Shapiro's comments about 12th Night. Neither book is dull and dry. The same is true of Will in the World.

It's great you are studying Shakespeare again. I have read and seen the canon. Except for Pericles and Henry VIII, I have seen at least two productions of every play. I've seen only one production of Two Noble Kinsmen. Reading Shakespeare is great; seeing Shakespeare is even better.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare 8 years 9 months ago #1790

  • akfarrar
  • akfarrar's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Professor
  • Posts: 272
  • Thank you received: 1
Whilst we are in the book recomendatin game - if you haven't read 'Shakespeare's Wife' you ain't cool!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare 8 years 9 months ago #1792

  • paulrobertwagner
  • paulrobertwagner's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Player
  • Posts: 66
Soothsayer wrote:
Paul - Will in the World is worth your time. The focus of the book is "How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare." At times, Greenblatt gets carried away with his ideas, but for the most part, the book is solid. His comments about Hamlet and King Lear are very good and give you something to think about. The book is in paperback.

There are two other books I also suggest you read, Shakespeare After All by Marjorie Garber and A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare 1599 by James Shapiro. Both are in paperback. Garber devotes a chapter to each play and the section "Suggestions For Further Reading" is very good. Shapiro's focus is on how current events influenced four plays" Henry V, As You Like It, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet. A Year in the Life begins with building the Globe Theatre. I disagree with Shapiro's comments about 12th Night. Neither book is dull and dry. The same is true of Will in the World.

It's great you are studying Shakespeare again. I have read and seen the canon. Except for Pericles and Henry VIII, I have seen at least two productions of every play. I've seen only one production of Two Noble Kinsmen. Reading Shakespeare is great; seeing Shakespeare is even better.

Soothsayer -- Thanks for the recommendations and the encouragement. I found a copy of the Shapiro book on line at an amazingly discounted price (it was less than $4.00, plus shipping), so I've ordered a copy. Will in the World is also on its way.

As for seeing Shakespeare, within 2 weeks of getting a copy of The Complete Pelican Shakespeare I was able to see our local Shakespeare troupe perform "The Merchant of Venice." It's an amateur group, but pretty polished, and open to new comers and novices. I plan to hook up with them in June, when they begin work on "Julius Caesar" (with "The Merry Wives of Windsor" to follow in July).
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare 8 years 9 months ago #1795

  • Charles Pecadore
  • Charles Pecadore's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Player
  • Posts: 75
Soothsayer wrote:
There are two other books I also suggest you read, Shakespeare After All by Marjorie Garber and A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare 1599 by James Shapiro. Both are in paperback. Garber devotes a chapter to each play and the section "Suggestions For Further Reading" is very good.
Shapiro also has an excellent chapter entitled "Bibliographical Essay" that will provide you with sufficient referential material to fill out the rest of your life ;)

Regards, Charles
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Will In The World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare 8 years 9 months ago #1798

  • paulrobertwagner
  • paulrobertwagner's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Player
  • Posts: 66
Shapiro also has an excellent chapter entitled "Bibliographical Essay" that will provide you with sufficient referential material to fill out the rest of your life ;) Regards, Charles

Charles,

I look forward to reading that essay once the book arrives. With the recommendations I've already received (including the titles on their way, as well as the individual plays themselves), it looks like I've got plenty to read, mark, learn and inwardly digest for the foreseeable future. Thanks!

Paul
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Moderators: William Shakespeare
 

Log in or Register

Register
Forgot username  Forgot password
Get the Shakespeare Pro app