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TOPIC: Jailers daughter

Jailers daughter 11 months 2 weeks ago #7318

  • Katie Johnson
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Act 3 scene 2 lines 1-38 with cut

I'm trying to find what the final sentences in this monologue mean so I know how to portray them. I am clueless as to what She is trying to say here. If anyone can help I'd really appreciate it thankyou

"Each errant Step beside is torment. Lo, the moon is down, the crickets chirp, the screech owl calls in the dawn. And all offices are done
Save what I fail in. But the point is this: an end, and that is all".
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Jailers daughter 11 months 2 weeks ago #7319

  • Ron Severdia
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Welcome!

The Jailer's Daughter is distraught because she thinks everything is falling apart. She was hoping to find Palamon when she came back to the forest, but he wasn't there. She's deathly afraid of darkness and the creatures of the night so she fears he's been killed. That notion combined with her father potentially being hanged for Palamon's escape (not to mention her lack of food, water, and sleep), she is somewhat delirious and feels she is at death's door.
Each errant Step beside is torment.

Right before this, she says the best/next way is to the grave. So any step around the grave itself, instead of falling in, is just painfully prolonging the inevitable.
Lo,
The moon is down, the crickets chirp, the screech owl
Calls in the dawn. And all offices are done
Save what I fail in.

She has been searching for Palamon all night with a file to help him remove his binds—and has failed to find him.
But the point is this: an end, and that is all.

She is assuming (incorrectly) Palamon is dead and her own end is possibly nigh.
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