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PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource

Smart Choices, More Voices Hot

Kurt Daw
https://www.playshakespeare.com/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/300x300s/46/43/29/15510-SC-Shakespeare-MuchAdo-1-300dpi-6-1438577578.jpg
Written by Kurt Daw     August 02, 2015    
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Mike Ryan (Benedick) and Greta Wohlrabe (Beatrice) in Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s  Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Photo by rr jones.

Photos: rr jones

Patty Gallagher (Leonata) and Kipp Moorman (Don Pedro) in Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Photo by C Games.
Greta Wohlrabe (Beatrice) in Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Photo by rr jones.
Mike Ryan (Benedick) in Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Photo by rr jones.
Madison Kisst (George Seacoal) and Steve Pickering (Dogberry) in Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Photo by rr jones.
Carols Angel-Barajas (Friar Francis), Isabel Pask (Ursula), Josh Saleh (Claudio), Suzanne Sturn (Antonia), Patty Gallagher (Leonata), Mike Ryan (Benedick), and Greta Wohlrabe (Beatrice) in Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakesp
The cast of Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Photo by rr jones.
  • Much Ado About Nothing
  • by William Shakespeare
  • Santa Cruz Shakespeare
  • June 30 - August 30, 2015
Acting 5
Costumes 4
Sets 4
Directing 5
Overall 5

Mike Ryan is making a lot of smart, invigorating decisions as Artistic Director at Santa Cruz Shakespeare, but the smartest of all might be to feature his own talents as Benedick in their current production of Much Ado About Nothing. He is an exceptional actor, generally under-utilized in dazzling cameos and featured sidekick roles. In this production he is evenly matched by the wonderful Greta Wohlrabe, who was outstanding last season in the secondary roles of Mistress Page in The Merry Wives of Windsor and Celia in As You Like It, and is even better now when she is promoted to the central role as Beatrice. Character actors are placed front and center - and celebrated - throughout this production, with the famously quarreling couple masterfully mining the text for both humor and emotional nuance.

Rosie the Riveter Revisited

Under the direction of Laura Gordon, the production is set just as the troops return from WWII, with strong Rosie the Riveter-type women tending what appears to be an idyllic California vineyard. (More about those women later!) Nina Ball's minimalist set and B. Modern's costumes give the show a postwar flavor that is never really foregrounded (at least not in the way that a similarly situated Taming of the Shrew at Livermore Shakespeare Festival utilized this tension a couple of seasons ago) but makes perfect sense as a background. The gorgeous lighting is by my San Francisco State University colleague Ray Oppenheimer, and Kurt Landisman.

The challenge of Much Ado is that the protagonists—a young Count Claudio and his intended bride, Hero—are not particularly large or compelling parts. Josh Saleh and Sarah Traisman are more than competent in these roles, but exploring the callowness of youth does not an evening make. The energy of the show must come from the supporting characters, particularly from Beatrice and Benedick who have to run the gamut from farce to borderline tragedy. A silly set of clowns also invigorates the proceedings (and provides the actual solution to the plot crisis, albeit accidentally).

Range and Virtuosity

Ryan and Wohlrabe find the complete range of tones in their characters. Both are pleasantly humorous in their farcical scenes but really come into their own when revealing the darker content. They handle the language beautifully, making the text accessible without compromise, but what ultimately makes this a moving and inspiring evening is that they are willing to explore their own emotional vulnerabilities in ways you rarely see in comedy.

Steve Pickering accomplishes a similar virtuosity, although he does it by playing a pair of contracting characters rather than revealing the range of a single one. His sinister Don John, the antagonist of the play, is coldly chilling but by the addition of a pair of glasses and a thick, hick dialect he becomes the hilarious constable Dogberry.

Another source of interest in the evening stems from Ryan's decision as AD that the organization should try to achieve gender parity in its casting. Because the casts of Shakespeare plays are far from evenly balanced with male and female roles, that involves some careful decisions about how to deal with the mismatch between supply and demand. It is possible for women to simply put on pants and play the male parts (a decision currently employed by San Francisco Shakespeare Festival) but Director Laura Gordon settled on prominently regendering the roles of Hero's father and uncle—Leonato and Antonio become Leonata and Antonia. This is not just a matter of switching pronouns, however. In a play with a plot that so thoroughly incorporates traditional gender roles and male privilege, the resulting shift in perspective could unsettle the balance.

Particularly at the moment of crisis, when Hero's parent turns on her after Claudio rejects her at the altar as unchaste, only an artist of fierce intelligence and exacting specificity could make that plausible as a mother's psychological shock rather than a father's loss of property and “honor.” Fortunately, Patty Gallagher is such an artist. Although known locally for her almost ditzy comic turns, she is both smart and brave, and in this production she totally “goes there.” Backed up with equal strength by Suzanne Sturn as her sister, the about-faces of the characters became not just more plausible, but actually more compelling when they finally do the right thing and confront the callow count and his misogynistic enabler, Don Pedro. It is worth seeing this production just to watch these two women reinterpret these roles.

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