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PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource
PlayShakespeare.com: The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource

Antony and Cleopatra Characters

Mark Antony

Antony is one of the triumvirs of Rome. The same as the Mark Antony of Julius Caesar, he is much older in this play, and ever-so-faintly past his prime.

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M. Aemilius Lepidus

Lepidus is one of the triumvirs of Rome. Disregarded by the other two, Antony and Caesar, he is either a buffoon or a decent man caught in the wrong job, depending on how he is played.

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Sextus Pompeius

Sextus Pompey is the son of Pompey the Great, whom Julius Caesar had defeated just before the opening of Julius Caesar.

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Ventidius

Ventidius is one of Antony’s generals. Antony sends him to make war on the Parthians, and he wins a great victory in which Pacorus, the son of Parthian king Orades, is killed.

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Eros

Eros is one of Antony’s attendants. He brings the news of Lepidus’s arrest by Caesar to Antony and also tells Enobarbus of it.

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Maecenas

Maecenas is one of Caesar’s followers. He attempts to calm down Antony and Caesar at their first conference.

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Gallus

Gallus is one of Caesar’s followers, and sent along with Proculeius when the latter is sent to keep Cleopatra from committing suicide.

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Menas

Menas is one of the two pirates who join cause with Pompey, helping to give him the mastery of the seas.

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Menecrates

Menecrates is one of the two pirates who join cause with Pompey, helping to give him the mastery of the seas.

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Schoolmaster (Ambassador)

An ambassador from Antony to Caesar is in fact Antony’s Schoolmaster. His being sent either means that Antony is done for, and has few followers left, as Dolabella states, or is a calculated insult to Caesar.

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Alexas

Alexas is one of Cleopatra’s attendants, the rather long-suffering butt of Charmian and Iras’s jokes.

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Seleucus

Seleucus is Cleopatra’s treasurer. When she gives Caesar a scroll apparently containing an inventory of all her wealth, she calls on him to witness that it is complete.

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Diomedes

Diomedes is one of Cleopatra’s followers. She sends him to Antony when she suddenly fears he may have killed himself, but he arrives too late.

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Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt

Cleopatra is the Queen of Egypt. Notoriously one of the most difficult characters to play in all of Shakespeare, she is deeply erotic, charismatic, theatrical, volatile, temperamental, and generally unclassifiable.

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Octavia

Octavia is Caesar’s sister. She is offered as a wife to Antony to seal a bond between him and Caesar.

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Charmian

Charmian is Cleopatra’s main lady-in-waiting. Saucy and given to making racy jokes on every available pretext, she is also deeply loyal to her mistress.

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Iras

Iras is Cleopatra’s second lady-in-waiting. She is somewhat more subdued a character than Charmian, but is just as able to make a dirty pun.

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Second Messenger

The Second Messenger comes from Sicyon with the news that Fulvia is dead.

First Egyptian Servant

The First Egyptian Servant announces Thidias’s arrival to Cleopatra. He later takes Thidias to be whipped.

Second Egyptian Servant

The Second Egyptian Servant [mute role] helps drag away Thidias to be whipped. He is later sent by Cleopatra to ask Caesar what his terms are.

First Roman Soldier

The First Roman Soldier [mute role] accompanies Proculeius on his visit to Cleopatra, and sneaks up on the Queen while she is distracted.

Second Roman Soldier

The Second Roman Soldier [mute role] accompanies Proculeius on his visit to Cleopatra, and sneaks up on the Queen while she is distracted.

Second Roman Guard

The Second Roman Guard is called in by the first guard when the latter discovers Cleopatra dead, and suggests finding Dolabella.

Antony's First Guardsman

Antony's First Guardsman is crestfallen at his flawed suicide, but refuse to give him the final blow to end his suffering, not being willing to be the one who ended his life.

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Antony's Second Guardsman

Antony's Second Guardsman is crestfallen at his flawed suicide, but refuse to give him the final blow to end his suffering, not being willing to be the one who ended his life.

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Antony's Third Guardsman

Antony’s Third Guardsman is crestfallen at his flawed suicide, but refuse to give him the final blow to end his suffering, not being willing to be the one who ended his life. 

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Caesar's First Watchman

Caesar's First Watchman is aware that the last day’s battle was a closely run thing, and wants to talk to Enobarbus, but is prevented by the Sentry.

Caesar's Second Watchman

Caesar's Second Watchman thinks that Enobarbus is only sleeping, and after his death holds some hope that he may recover.

Caesar's First Soldier

Caesar's First Soldier brings Enobarbus the news that Antony has sent all of his treasure after him. Enobarbus does not believe him, but the soldier assures him that it is true.

Caesar's First Messenger

Caesar's First Messenger brings Caesar the unwelcome news that Pompey has a strong sea force, and that the people who follow him do it out of love, while they merely obey Caesar from fear.

Caesar's Second Messenger

Caesar's Second Messenger brings the news that Menas and Menecrates have joined with Pompey, and that they have total mastery of the sea, prompting Caesar’s outburst at Antony.

Caesar's Third Messenger

Caesar's Third Messenger comes to tell him that Antony has advanced for battle. He is sent to have the soldiers who deserted Antony placed at the front of the troops, so that they’ll bear the brunt of the assault.

Antony's Third Soldier

Antony's Third Soldier identifies the music as coming from under the earth, and realizes that this is not a good omen for their side. 

Antony's Fourth Soldier

Antony's Fourth Soldier thinks (hopes?) that the strange music is a good omen for Antony’s side in the coming battle.

First Roman Messenger

The First Roman Messenger attempts to deliver some news from Rome to Antony, but is brushed off.

Second Roman Messenger

The Second Roman Messenger confirms to Antony that Caesar has taken Toryne, proof of the startling speed at which he is advancing.

Pompey's First Servant

Pompey's First Servant bringing in the banquet (dessert) at the feast on Pompey’s galley notes how Lepidus continues drinking even though he likely knows he shouldn’t. He also appears to mock Lepidus as being of little note to the world.

Pompey's Second Servant

Pompey's Second Servant bringing in the banquet (dessert) at the feast on Pompey’s galley comments on how Lepidus is either asking to no longer have drinks pressed on him, or begging the other two triumvirs to cease quarreling. The fact that it clearly isn’t working does not leave him impressed.

 

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